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Posts Tagged ‘PAWS’

Urgent: PAWS shelter closing Jan 1. They need foster help for a month.

Posted by smallspark on December 29, 2008

Update: A false rumor on craigslist prompted my post. See below for  information and to read the SPCA’s information on the PACCA/PAWS takeover.

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Please please – if you can foster a dog or cat or several – if you have an extra room in your house…if you ever wanted to make a difference…if you weren’t sure about taking an animal permanently and wanted to test out pet ownership…please Foster an animal from PAWS right now. For one month.

The PAWS/PACCA shelter is closing Jan 1 due to the city’s new contract with SPCA. Animals need transitional homes from 1 week to 1 month. (They always need foster homes for animals however not for the transitional reason)

Literally save an animals life – YOU really do make a difference here. SPCA really will kill them, if they are sick or if they are not. (FALSE RUMOR info noted below)

New foster parents are teamed up with experienced foster parents…they will help you and teach you! (True)

Please look in the pets section (http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/pet/) at for more info or go to PAWS immediately. They are staying very late there so the animals can find safe places to stay. (Not sure if this is true however they are open from 11-6 most days)

PAWS closes Jan 1. (True – they are being taken over by PACCA Jan 1)

Please help a furry, huggable, sad little animal be safe and give them a chance to find a new home where they can be part of a family. (Always True!)

PAWS Main Shelter  (Soon to be PSPCA shelter)
111 West Hunting Park Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19140
Ph: 267-385-3800

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I received a comment from Kim, below, and it seems that the craigslist postings on the above are an untrue rumor.  I’m posting the SPCA page here in my post to help inform others.

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Philadelphia, December 1, 2008 – The City of Philadelphia today announced that it has awarded its animal control contract to the Pennsylvania SPCA (PSPCA). The contract goes into effect on January 1, 2009.

“We are honored to have been selected to provide comprehensive animal services for the City of Philadelphia. Our board, staff and volunteers are eager to devote our experience and compassion to ensure that Philadelphia has a first-class animal care and control program,” said PSPCA CEO Howard Nelson.

Taking leadership of the Philadelphia animal control contract involves a major operational transition in a short period—one month. “We are focused on building the best animal control function for the city. Over the course of the next four weeks, PSPCA staff will be working hard to ensure as seamless a transition as possible as we take on this new challenge to better serve the city’s residents, and most importantly, its animals in need,” said Nelson. “We will share in detail our animal control plans for the public’s review shortly.”

This site is still under development. Please check this website for updates as they are available. Philadelphians with questions regarding the PSPCA’s animal control team can email ACT@pspca.org.

Collateral

PSPCA’s Request for Proposal to the City of Philadelphia
Animal Control Team (ACT) Powered by the PSPCA – Organizational Chart

Companion Animal Protection Act and Animal Rescue Policy

The PSPCA will support and comply with all components of No Kill Solutions’ Companion Animal Protection Act (CAPA). The provisions of CAPA are in line with the PSPCA’s commitment to strengthening its 141-year-old mission to rescue animals from abuse and neglect, provide lifesaving care and treatment, guarantee a home for every adoptable animal, and reduce pet-overpopulation through low-cost spay-and-neuter clinics and public awareness initiatives. For more information about CAPA, view the abstract and FAQs or the 2007 Companion Animal Protection Act. To read PSPCA CEO Howard Nelson’s letter to Nathan Winograd, author of CAPA, click here (PDF – 32.5MB).

Currently, the citywide euthanasia rate is higher than most major cities per capita. This is unacceptable and the PSPCA the programs outlined below in its efforts to make Philadelphia a no-kill city.

ACT Powered by the PSPCA: Myth vs. Fact

Myth: Animals at PACCA will be euthanized on December 31, 2008.

Fact: The animals will not be euthanized. When ACT powered by the PSPCA takes over the shelter at Front Street and Hunting Park Avenue at midnight on January 1, 2009, it will implement new animal care standards for animals currently residing at the shelter and new animals coming in. The new care standards include medical staff, a behaviorist, and more lifesaving staff dedicated to working with foster, rescue and shelter partners.

The PSPCA and Pit Bulls: Myth vs. Fact

Myth: The PSPCA practices breed-specific Pit Bull euthanization.

Fact: The PSPCA does not practice breed-specific euthanization of Pit Bulls. We believe Pit Bulls are loving animals that can make great pets, and we do everything we can to give them a second chance at life. As with any other breed, we evaluate each Pit Bull’s temperament and health, ensuring that the dog is not “dangerous” and it will not experience prolonged pain and suffering.

For more facts about the PSPCA’s Pit Bull adoption policy, click here. We encourage the public to visit our adoption center at 350 E. Erie Avenue to see the lovely pets, including Pit Bulls, that we have available for adoption each and every day. The public can also see adoptable animals here.

ASPCA’s Mission Orange Philadelphia Program

According to the ASPCA’s Mission Orange Philadelphia program, of which the PSPCA is a partner, Philadelphia’s live release rate was 50.26% for January-June 2008. In a city with more than one million people, this number is not acceptable. The PSPCA, by being committed to CAPA, is working to increase the live release rate to 85% for Philadelphia. For more information about Mission Orange, click here.

ACT Program Enhancements

ACT powered by the PSPCA is dedicated to better serving all of Philadelphia’s animals in need. Animals will be fed twice a day (three times for emaciated animals). ACT will offer more lifesaving staff working with foster, rescue and shelter partners to find homes for more animals; a larger fleet of vehicles, removing animals from the street where they could possibly be hit and injured by cars; a behaviorist to assess animals entering the shelter; and a medical team to provide necessary lifesaving treatment.

ACT is committed to enhancing the animal care facility. Volunteers and contractors wishing to participate in a shelter makeover to clean and organize the shelter on December 31, 2008, and January 1, 2009, should call 215-426-6304, ext. 244 or email splattenberger@pspca.org.

Jobs

The PSPCA is looking for dedicated, qualified individuals to join the ACT team, including Director of Animal Control. View available positions and email your resume to jobs@pspca.org. Please be sure to reference the position(s) that you are interested in.

Volunteers

The PSPCA welcomes animal control-focused volunteers who want to make a difference in the lives of Philadelphia’s animals in need. Find out how to become a PSPCA volunteer. For dates of upcoming PSPCA orientation sessions, contact PSPCA Volunteer Coordinator Stacey Plattenberger at 215-426-6304, ext. 244 or via email at splattenberger@pspca.org.

ACT Advisory Council

A 10-member ACT advisory council is being formed. Those interested in serving on the council should email a resume and letter of interest to mpolo@pspca.org.

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PAWS animals need you short time NOW

Posted by smallspark on July 4, 2008

Hi everyone, Would you pass the message below on to anyone? It’s
about temporarily fostering animals for the animal shelter here in
phila..the numbers are just heartbreaking.

They really need temporary (very temporary for the kittens, anyway)
foster mommy and daddies…. For example: If you pick baby kittens to
care for, it’s simply one extra room in your house or one wire cage
somewhere safe so they can grow old enough to be adopted.

I never knew about fostering animals before I moved to Philly and
that’s why I share this.

It’s hard to contemplate fostering but knowing you are making a short
term accommodation while helping one or more animal live to get to
it’s forever home while at the same time getting so many personal
rewards: affection, exercise, community and more – I more than think
its win-win, I really do know it is.

Thanks

Below is the email I received from the PAWS mailing list:

__________

This is an urgent plea for your help. PAWS is taking in well over 100
animals every single day — too many to house, and too many to save on
our own. There are many ways you can help:

Please rescue us!Foster kittens: PAWS has more kittens than space.
Yesterday alone, we had 28 litters of kittens by 10 am and were able
to get only four out into foster care. More are coming in all the
time, so every hour is critical. We are especially full with sweet,
wonderfull momma cats that have nursing litters, as well as orphaned
newborns that need to be bottle fed and young orphan kittens who are
eating on their own. They urgently need foster care in order to
survive. Foster care provides a safe place for them to grow to an
adoptable age and find good adoptive homes, and frees up much needed
space at the shelter for other needy animals. If you have a spare room
in your house please consider helping us get these adorable babies and
their mommas out!

Foster a dog: The shelter is packed with dogs — large and small,
young and old — who are desperately waiting for a chance at life. We
cannot house them all, and more are coming in all the time —
approximately 35-40 each and every day. By taking one home
temporarily, you give them the chance at life they deserve and make
room at the shelter for another whose life depends on us having the
space.

I need you! Please rescue me!IF YOU CAN FOSTER AN ANIMAL: Come to the
shelter (111 W. Hunting Park Avenue) immediately. A staff person or
foster care volunteer will be thrilled to help you find the right
animal(s) for you to take into safety. Foster care hours are 11 am to
6 pm every day of the week. To make special arrangements to come at
another time of day, please email Natalie at Natalie@phillypaws.org
(please email only as a last resort; Natalie is inundated. It is best
to just come directly to the shelter.)

Directions to the shelter are available here:
http://www.phillypaws.org/hours_directions.cfm

More information about foster care is available here:
http://www.phillypaws.org/foster_parenting_faq.cfm

Please, Would you help?

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